Ten cutting-edge medical device and imaging technologies to transform the healthcare sector

Solutions incorporating innovations from diverse industries will remain at the heart of medical diagnosis and treatment, finds Frost & Sullivan research

Sophisticated innovations in medical devices, diagnostics and imaging have given birth to less-expensive and flexible healthcare solutions which are playing a critical role in managing the increasing frequency of chronic diseases.

A striking feature of Frost & Sullivan’s list of Top Medical Device and Imaging Technologies of 2015 is the potential of these technologies to address needs across developed, developing, and emerging countries.

Collaborative and multi-cluster advancements in conjunction with non-healthcare industries will significantly reduce development times and lower barriers to market entry

The analysis reveals growth in the healthcare industry will centre around the following 10 technologies: surgical robots, digital pathology, neuroprosthetics, surgical laser, smart pills, optical imaging, health informatics, integrated vital signs monitoring, artificial organs and four-dimensional (4D) ultrasound imaging.

New modalities such as neuroprosthesis and hybrid imaging are moving towards commercialisation; and technologies already in the early commercialisation phase, including smart pills and surgical robots, will find widespread uses across applications.

“The strong merits of the top 10 medical device and imaging technologies attract the attention of large and small healthcare companies alike,” said Frost & Sullivan ‘TechVision’ senior research analyst, Bhargav Rajan.

“Traditionally, cautious tier-1 firms stake claim in these pioneering modalities directly or indirectly through funding, tie-ups and acquisitions.”

A common thread connecting the 10 solutions is their scope for convergence with non-medical platforms. Innovations in electronics, sensors, information technology, and advanced manufacturing are actively powering product and technology progress in medical and imaging devices. Non-healthcare businesses such as Google and IBM invest in these technologies.

“Stringent regulatory requirements, as well as a competitive intellectual property landscape, prolong the time-to-market and strain returns on investment,” said Rajan.

“Collaborative and multi-cluster advancements in conjunction with non-healthcare industries will significantly reduce development times and lower barriers to market entry.”

Stringent regulatory requirements, as well as a competitive intellectual property landscape, prolong the time-to-market and strain returns on investment

Once commercialised, these multi-disciplinary medical and imaging devices with long lifespans will consistently influence market potential, research and development, and global adoption over several years.

Top Medical Device and Imaging Technologies in 2015, a part of the TechVision subscription, identifies and profiles the 10 technologies expected to shape the medical device and imaging industry. It throws light on technology capability, maturity, global research intensity, adoption over the short and medium terms, and funding activities.

Click here to access the research in full.

Companies