Neo Pedicle Screw System for spinal fusion surgery subject of Medical Innovation Briefing

Device offers possible reduction in costs, space, and instruments needed for surgery

The Neo Pedicle Screw System for spinal fusion surgery is the latest innovative technology to be the subject of a NICE MedTech Innovation Briefing.

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The technology, manufactured by Neo Medical, is made up of a set of single-use instruments and implantable screws and rods used for spinal fusion surgery in adults.

The innovative aspects detailed in the briefing are that it contains fewer components in fewer trays than standard instrument sets.

This is designed to provide the same function as a standard system, but to take up less storage space.

By using fewer instruments and fewer screws it could also potentially streamline surgery and it has a proprietary soft-tissue protector that covers the screws from sterilisation until contact with the pedicle, which is designed to reduce the risk of infection.

The intended place in therapy is instead of single-use and reusable pedicle screw systems during spinal fusion surgery in adults.

However, the briefing also outlines a key uncertainty - the lack of technical success or efficacy evidence.

And it states that studies assessing length of surgery, implant failure rates, rates of successful correction and maintenance of deformity, rates of infection, and functionality compared with other pedicle screw systems would be beneficial.

The cost of the Neo Pedicle Screw System is £1,880 for a single-level system, excluding VAT. This includes training by the distributor, which is minimal.

The resource impact would be similar to standard care, but with a potential reduction in costs, space, and instruments needed.

NICE Medtech Innovation Briefings aim to support NHS and social care commissioners and staff who are considering using new medical devices and other medical or diagnostic technologies. The information provided includes a description of the technology, how it’s used, and its potential role in the treatment pathway.

They also include a review of relevant published evidence and the likely costs of using the technology, but they are not NICE guidance and do not make any recommendations on the value of using the technologies. Whether or not to use the products described is entirely the choice of local staff.

However, the briefings will help to avoid the need for organisations to produce similar information, so saving staff time, effort and resources.

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