Latest NICE Medtech Innovation Briefing gives overview of children's cancer sequencing technology

Solution developed by medical experts could expand level of genomic analysis in children with solid tumour cancers

  • NICE innovation briefing provides overview of next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based panel used to sequence genetic mutations in solid tumour cancers in children
  • Document includes evidence from UK analytical validity and diagnostic accuracy study
  • But warns evidence base and technology are still in early stages of development

A next-generation sequencing panel for solid tumour cancers in children is the subject of the latest Medtech Innovation Briefing from the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

The briefings aim to support NHS and social care commissioners and staff who are considering using new medical devices and other medical or diagnostic technologies.

The information provided includes a description of the technology, how itís used, and its potential role in the treatment pathway.

They also include a review of relevant published evidence and the likely costs of using the technology, but they are not NICE guidance and do not make any recommendations on the value of using the technologies. Whether or not to use the products described is entirely the choice of local staff.

However, they will help to avoid the need for organisations to produce similar information, so saving staff time, effort and resources.

The latest briefing explores the potential impact of using the next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based panel for solid tumour cancers in children which was developed as an in-house laboratory test by the Centre for Molecular Pathology at The Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust.

Developed with input from a wide range of experts it is highly optimised and tailored specifically to solid tumours in children.

According to the briefing, the intended place in therapy would be in addition to standard care or as a replacement to less-extensive gene testing to expand the level of genomic analysis in children with solid tumour cancers.

Evidence summarised in the report comes from one UK analytical validity and diagnostic accuracy study that included a total of 132 samples in a genomics laboratory using clinical samples from laboratories worldwide.

This showed that the NGS panel detected 94 of 95 (98.9%) well-characterised genetic abnormalities in 33 clinical specimens and 13 cell lines.

However, the briefing warns that the evidence and technology are still in early development.

Click here for the full briefing.

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