Innovative dementia care home achieves Stirling 'Gold Standard'

Fremantle Court meets stringent standards set by Stirling University’s Dementia Services Development Centre

Fremantle Court

A flagship care home developed by Castleoak for The Fremantle Trust has achieved the University of Stirling Dementia ‘Gold Standard’.

The 90-bed home, Fremantle Court in Stoke Mandeville, designed by architects Hunters, is part of a new generation of dementia-friendly care homes that are changing the way residents with dementia are cared for.

James Wallace, director at Hunters Architects, said: “We set out to create a home of excellence for people living with dementia. Through innovation in the layout and interior design we have achieved the Stirling ‘Gold Standard’ in a subtle and attractive way.

“The scheme majors on visual access, which allows residents to enjoy their home while retaining their independence with freedom of choice to do or go where they want.”

Steve Flanagan, chief executive of The Fremantle Trust added: “Fremantle Court is a key milestone in our strategy to deliver a new generation of specialist care homes in the UK.

“Working closely with Castleoak, we have used our combined sector expertise to produce a design blueprint for future homes, ensuring we continue to deliver the highest standard of dementia care.”

And Craig Currie, chief executive at Castleoak, said: “We are delighted that the innovative care home we have delivered at Stoke Mandeville is starting to receive the accolades it deserves.

“Working in close partnership with The Fremantle Trust, we have focused on achieving the rigorous dementia care standards set by Stirling University, and delivering a care home that we can all be proud of.”

Stirling University’s ‘Gold Standard’ is awarded by its acclaimed Dementia Services Development Centre following an expert audit to determine whether a care home has been built to their exacting standards in dementia care.

Fremantle Court achieved a final score of 96% and 100% for the essential features, with the report concluding that ‘there were numerous examples of best practice from the overall layout and principles to the small details’.

Within the scheme, living wings revolve around secure central courtyard areas, with communal balconies and gardens.

And corridors have been redefined as living spaces, working as communal destinations for residents.

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