Carbon reduction: News in brief

£4.5m boost for sustainability

“The new products and services proposed should have a reduced environmental impact compared to current alternatives, and/or should be less dependent on the use of strategic materials

THE Technology Strategy Board (TSB) is to invest up to £4.5m in a new collaborative research and development project aimed at encouraging industrial end-users to work with supply chains and innovators to create new products and services for a sustainable economy. The objective of the competition, which opens on 3 October, is to help companies mobilise their supply chains to provide innovations that are precisely targeted to their currently unmet needs. The initiative addresses two high-level challenges - reducing the global environmental impact of the materials we use, and reducing dependence on key raw materials, the supply of which is potentially at risk. A TSB spokesman said: “The new products and services proposed should have a reduced environmental impact compared to current alternatives, and/or should be less dependent on the use of strategic materials.” The first networking event to facilitate consortia building for the competition will take place on 20 September in London. The event will also see the launch of a Materials Security Special Interest Group.

Gales highlight flaw in new wind turbine

JUST days after becoming fully operational, the wind turbine at Stevenage's Lister Hospital has been temporarily decommissioned after one of its six-foot blades flew off in high winds and hit a car. East and North Hertfordshire NHS Trust officially opened its £7.9m eco-friendly car park last week, with the turbine planned to produce 10% of the structure's electricity. Now the remaining blades have been removed as a precaution while the manufacturer investigates the event which left the roof of a member of staff's car damaged. Nick Carver, the trust's chief executive, said: “VINCI Park and its suppliers are investigating the incident and the turbine will only be operational when the technical issue is resolved and tested to everyone's satisfaction.”

Newham trust scoops green award

NEWHAM University Hospital NHS Trust has been presented with a Green Apple Environment Award as part of a national campaign to find Britain’s greenest organisations. The trust was selected out of 500 nominations and will find out whether it has won Gold, Silver or Bronze when presented with the award at a ceremony on 14 November in the House of Commons. To reduce energy use and cut carbon emissions, the trust has invested £1.1m in a new building energy management system and installed three new air handling units, with a guaranteed payback period of 6.6 years. Justin Pereira, assistant director of site development and facilities, said: “We are so proud to have won this award. Over recent years we have been working hard to reduce our carbon footprint and to create sustainable facilities that will enable us to provide healthcare for the future. We have undertaken a capital development programme that has allowed us to save not only money that can be ploughed back into patient care, but has also brought us a step closer to becoming carbon neutral.”

Voltage stabilisers installed at Suffolk hospitals

ENERGY and carbon output should be drastically reduced at two community hospitals in Suffolk following the installation of state-of-the-art voltage stabilisers. The PowerPerfectors are expected to prevent the emission of 50,000kg of CO2 gas from Felixstowe and Newmarket community hospitals by reducing incoming voltage from 242V, as most electrical equipment operates on 220V. Mark Marshall, head of corporate development and infrastructure for NHS Suffolk, said: “The installation of this new technology will pay for itself and then help us save significant sums of money over many years to follow, as well as make an important contribution to the reduction of carbon emissions. It is without a doubt the right thing to do on a number of levels on high-usage sites and we will be looking at other opportunities to do more of the same.”

The installation of this new technology will pay for itself and then help us save significant sums of money over many years to follow, as well as make an important contribution to the reduction of carbon emissions

Food disposal unit cuts waste

SOUTH Warwickshire NHS Foundation Trust has installed a food waste disposal unit at Warwick Hospital to reduce the amount it sends to landfill and cut its carbon footprint. The Waste-2-O unit uses micro-organisms to break food waste down into water with no residue which can then be safely disposed of through the hospital’s drains within 24 hours. Amit Mistry, waste environmental officer at the trust, said: “The installation of the Waste-2-O unit is a fantastic innovative way for the hospital to reduce the amount of waste that we are creating. The trust is committed to taking steps like these to reduce our carbon footprint.”

ALSO IN THE NEWS:

A new magnetic technology that could help to save energy and reduce heat loss is being marketed to hospitals across the country. Warmroom, developed by Anchor Magnets of Sheffield, can be attached to the back of radiators to reduce the amount of heat escaping through the walls by 60%, according to tests by the University of Sheffield.

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